iStock-465391153_v2.jpg

EMPLOYERS

dreamstime_xxl_29348545.jpg

JOB SEEKERS

Streamline Your Workflow by Assigning Tasks to Days of the Week

AdobeStock_135732247.jpeg

Switching between a number of different tasks during the day can make it hard to focus, and can make completing those tasks harder than they need to be. Instead of shifting your focus back and forth during the day, try and dedicate specific days to specific tasks. It’s an idea called context switching as outlined by Fast Company in their February 15th post.

The idea is simple: Rather than shift your focus throughout the day, group together similar tasks so that you can streaming completing them. In Fast Company’s example, a business owner used the first two weeks of the month to meet with new clients and the last two to work with VIPs.

The idea is simple: Rather than shift your focus throughout the day, group together similar tasks so that you can streaming completing them

What makes sense depends on your personal job responsibilities and workflow. Breaking things down has a ton of benefits. Two big ones:

You always know what you’re working on. Rather than juggling five plates Monday morning, you can start the week knowing “today I’m handling new proposals” or whatever the thing is you’ve assigned yourself.

You don’t end up with “hell” days crammed full of unrelated things, only to have a day at end of the week where you’re surfing Facebook.

You don’t have to constantly change your focus during the day, allowing you to really focus on what you’re trying to accomplish.

Clearly, this won’t work for all job types, and how you break things up will depend a lot on what you do. While some people might be able to dedicate entire days to projects, for you, context switching might mean just dedicating your afternoons to a specific task each day while leaving your mornings a multi-tasking adventure, or blocking out a few hours for specific tasks each day.

The more like tasks you’re able to lump together, the easier the group of them will likely become.